Cannabis Certification Clinic

Misconceptions 

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Common Misconceptions & the “Rest of the Story”

A common misconception is that you are given a prescription for marijuana, with the dose in milligrams, the route of administration, and the number of pills, etc. (just like your treating doctor).   

In actuality, none of the above is correct. If you have a qualified condition and after all of the above prerequisites are met, your name and identifying information is entered in a State of Florida “registry”:  (O.M.M.U.---Office of Medical Marijuana of the State of Florida).  You send in additional information and a fee to the OMMU (instructions for this will be provided). You receive a card from the state a few weeks later and can then purchase cannabis. The amount, route of administration and dosing is completely up to you.  (therefore, the need for knowledge on your part about what you are doing). The physician is only allowed to enter your maximum total amount of cannabis consumed in a 70-day period.   The rest is up to you. Two refills are allowed  (total 210 days) Then you must be re-evaluated for additional refills. (re-certification)

The nearest distribution center is Jacksonville, but there are distribution centers scattered throughout the state. Each distribution center offers a different group of products, since they are owned by different companies.  These are strictly retail operations and their information may be only as good as the sales person waiting on you at the time.  As with anything else the buyer should beware.

THE BOTTOM LINE; YOU ARE IN CHARGE OF WHAT YOU TAKE, INCLUDING THE ROUTE AND THE AMOUNT .

You may also appoint a caregiver, who also is issued a card by the State of Florida. You must be a Florida resident, or can show proof of living here for at least 30 days. This will need to be provided to the state. 

There is no prescription, no drugs on the premises, no samples.  (all of this is against the law for any physician and punishable by loss of license.)  On the other hand, it is illegal (misdemeanor) for an applicant to provide false information to the physician about your medical condition, so there are responsibilities on both sides of the fence.